Our Gastroenterology Blog

Posts for: February, 2020

By Digestive Disease Associates of York Country
February 26, 2020
Category: Gastroenterology
Tags: Rectal Bleeding  

Wiping and finding traces of blood can certainly be unnerving. While rectal bleeding can be caused by self-limiting problems that will go away on their own it’s also important to recognize when you may need to seek treatment from a qualified gastroenterologist.

Causes of Rectal Bleeding

You can usually tell where the bleeding is coming from based on the color of the blood. Bright red blood typically means that it’s originating in the rectum or colon, while darker blood may be a sign that there is bleeding in the stomach or elsewhere in the digestive tract.

The most common causes of rectal bleeding include:

  • Hemorrhoids
  • Fistula (an infected tunnel between the skin and anus)
  • Fissures or tears
  • Diverticulitis
  • Colitis (also referred to as proctitis)
  • Gastroenteritis
  • Rectal prolapse (caused by weak rectal tissue)
  • Colon polyps
  • Internal bleeding (With the rectum of GI tract)
  • Colon cancer

When to See a Doctor

While you probably won’t need to pick up the phone and call your GI doctor the minute you notice a little blood, it is important to understand when the condition does require an immediate checkup or even emergency care. Minor rectal bleeding is fairly common and will happen to most people at some point during their lifetime. Minor bleeding that goes away on its own won’t require additional treatment or care.

However, if you are dealing with persistent, severe or painful rectal bleeding this could be a sign of a more serious health problem that will require an evaluation by a gastrointestinal doctor. If you are dealing with rectal bleeding you should call your doctor if you:

  • Notice bleeding that lasts up to 2-3 weeks
  • Also experience a fever, fatigue or unexplained weight loss
  • Have severe abdominal pain or your stomach is tender to the touch
  • Notice changes in the shape, color or size of your stools for more than three weeks
  • Also experience nausea and vomiting
  • Are dealing with persistent bowel changes (e.g. constipation or diarrhea)
  • Experience anal leakage

Vomiting blood, tar-like stools, bloody diarrhea, or severe abdominal pain all require emergency medical attention. In this case your gastroenterologist may advise you to go to the nearest emergency room.

Are you dealing with rectal bleeding that has you concerned? If so, a gastroenterologist can find out what’s causing your symptoms and help you get your GI health back on track.


By Digestive Disease Associates of York Country
February 12, 2020
Category: Gastroenterology
Tags: Hepatitis  

Most people who have hepatitis don’t even know that they have it. This is because it doesn’t often cause symptoms right away; however, untreated hepatitis can lead to serious health problems including liver scarring, cirrhosis of the liver, and cancer.

Hepatitis is a condition that causes inflammation of the liver. There are five types of hepatitis: A, B, C, D, and E. There are many causes of hepatitis and it’s important that you visit your gastroenterologist to understand your risks and to detect hepatitis early on before it causes serious and potentially permanent damage to the liver.

Hepatitis can be contracted by sharing items or having sex with an infected person. It’s also possible for mothers to pass hepatitis onto their babies during childbirth. Hepatitis can also be contracted through contaminated food or water.

Hepatitis A: this form of hepatitis is most often contracted by consuming contaminated water or food; however, hepatitis A can also be transmitted through unprotected sex with an infected person. This is considered a short-term infection.

Hepatitis B: hepatitis B can cause both acute and chronic infections and is often contracted when someone comes in contact with bodily fluid such as semen or blood from an infected person. This form of hepatitis can also be transmitted from mother to baby.

Hepatitis C: this type of hepatitis is contracted through blood; therefore, it’s more common to get this infection through the exchange of needles or injections. Like hepatitis B, this is usually a short-term infection but can cause chronic problems.

Hepatitis D: this is a less common form of hepatitis within the US, and only occurs in those who also have hepatitis B. Due to the fact that there are two forms of viral hepatitis present within the body, this can lead to serious and fast liver damage.

Hepatitis E: this short-term form of hepatitis is usually contracted through contaminated foods or tainted water.

Despite the fact that there are five different kinds of hepatitis, all of these types produce similar symptoms. It’s important to see your GI doctor right away if you are dealing with these warning signs of hepatitis:

  • Joint pain
  • Nausea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Fatigue
  • Pale or clay-colored stools
  • Dark urine
  • Jaundice (Causes yellowing of the eyes and skin)
  • Severe itching
  • Abdominal pain usually in the upper right side (where your liver is located)

With certain types of hepatitis these symptoms may appear but go away. Even if these symptoms disappear it’s still important to visit a gastroenterologist.